Judge William G. Young

Born 1940 in Huntington, NY

Federal Judicial Service

Judge, U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts. Assumed senior status on July 1, 2021.

Nominated by Ronald Reagan on March 8, 1985, to a new seat created by 98 Stat. 333; Confirmed by the Senate on April 3, 1985, and received commission on April 4, 1985.

Served as Chief Judge, 1999 - 2005

Education

Harvard University, A.B., 1962
Harvard Law School, LL.B., 1967


Courthouse

Boston Courthouse

John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse
1 Courthouse Way, Suite 2300
Boston, Massachusetts 02210

Courtroom

18, 5th floor

John J. Moakley Federal Courthouse - Boston, MA
John J. Moakley Federal Courthouse - Boston, MA

Courtroom Technology

Contact the courtroom clerk regarding the use of technology in the courtroom. View our courtroom technology page for more information on the technology that is available.

Internet access is available upon request and with the consent of the presiding Judge. Click here for more information.


Staff
Judicial Assistant Elizabeth Sonnenberg   elizabeth_sonnenberg@mad.uscourts.gov
Courtroom Clerk Jennifer Gaudet 617-748-9156 jennifer_gaudet@mad.uscourts.gov
Docket Clerk Matthew Paine 617-748-9157 matthew_paine@mad.uscourts.gov
Court Reporter Richard Romanow   bulldog@richromanow.com
Chambers Procedures/Standing Orders/Sample Orders

N/A

Cameras in the Courtroom

A work-a-day Judge at work:

Videos depicting the routine work of a United States District Judge

The Judge's Common Book


Scheduling Conferences
Scheduling Conferences (Which includes the cases listed below)
  • 11-11203 Boston Atlantic Parking v. Ottenberg
  • 12-11161 HighRes Biosolution v. Acrylic Tank Mfg
  • 12-11636 Allegro Software v. A10 Networks
  • 12-11946 5th AP Company v. National Condo Ins.
  • 12-12076 Weymouth v. Cousins et al
  • 12-12091 CFN Agency v. Liberty Mutual
  • 12-12102 Capachone et al v. Toyota Motor Sales 12-12117 Peak v. MA Bay Commuter Rail
  • 12-12119 Marshall v. Nat'l Retail Prop et al
Status Conference
12-02409 In re: Nexium Litigation (MDL Case)

Motion Sessions
Markman Hearing
11-948 WhitServ. GoDaddy.com

Juror Welcome Speech
Juror Welcome Speech

Jury Empanelment
10-11117 Miranda v. Hurley

Charge to Jury
12-10326 Lu v. Boston College
USDC Judicial Forum Survey

Civil - Case Management

Q4: What, if any, inquiries do you make about settlement prospects and/or interest in mediation at the initial scheduling conference?

A4: I do not inquire about settlement as I consider it too early in the process. While mediation is voluntary, I schedule it unless the parties refuse.

Q5: What, if any inquiries do you make about the liklihood of trial at the initial scheduling conference?

A5: Since the parties are in court I assume they want a trial and schedule the trial month (not more than 12 months from the initial scheduling conference).

Q6: What schedule do you set at the initial scheduling conference?

A6: The filing of summary judgment motions will be within 9 months of the conference, the final pre-trial conference within 11 months, and the trial within 12 months.

Q8: If so, when do you hold status conferences?

A8: Respondent skipped this question

Civil - Discovery

Q12: If the parties intend to file a proposed protective order, do you require any particular format and/or a specific time for doing so?

A12: General protective orders, while encouraged, are not the place to address filing any sealed materials with the Court, a practice I disfavor.

Q13: Under what circumstances would you consider a bifurcation of discovery ?

A13: While willing to consider bifurcation in any appropriate case, it’s been my experience that it usually causes unnecessary delay.

Q14: Given the new requirement under Fed. R. Civ. P. 26(b)(1) regarding the proportionality of the scope of discovery, what, if any inquiry do you make about this issue at the initial scheduling conference?

A14: Judge Keeton taught me to act like a baseball arbitrator in resolving case management issues, i.e. tell the parties to be “reasonable” and then choose one or another of the various proposals presented on the basis of which is more reasonable and proportionate.

Q17: Do you typically hold a hearing on discovery?

A17: No, I handle discovery motions myself without oral hearings save in extremely rare circumstances.

Q18: Please describe your general practice regarding the resolution of discovery motions.

A18: I handle discovery motions myself without oral hearings save in extremely rare circumstances.

Q19: Under what circumstances will you consider emergency motions regarding discovery matters?

A19: I will always consider them. Calling a motion an emergency doesn’t make it one.

Q20: Do you have any particular practices or requirements about expert disclosures?

A20: Other than a discovery completion date I have no particular requirement, Daubert hearings are extremely rare. No expert is permitted to testify to anything not fully revealed in that expert’s report.

Q21: What, if any, expert discovery deadlines do you set at the initial scheduling conference? When do you typically set a schedule for the filing of Daubert motions?

A21: Other than a discovery completion date I have no particular requirement, Daubert hearings are extremely rare. No expert is permitted to testify to anything not fully revealed in that expert’s report.

Civil - Dispositive Motions

Q25: Do you typically allow reply briefs and/or surreply briefs?

A25: Yes. I welcome all the written help I can get. I don’t wait for reply and other briefs before ruling.

Q29: If you typically hold hearings on dispositive motions, what, if any, time limits do you impose on counsel for their arguments?

A29: Usually no more than 10 minutes per side. 5 minutes per side for more straight forward motions

Civil - Patent Cases

Q33: Do you have particular practice about Markman hearings? If so, please describe them including but not limited to whether you allow tutorial(s).

A33: Eight different constructions are about enough in any one case. I come on the bench with a tentative construction in mind, share it with the parties, and we discuss it, eventually settling on a construction. If either party is dissatisfied, I’ll hear from an expert from each side as to why I’m wrong (or right) in a one hour hot tub experience. I welcome jointly agreed written tutorials.

Criminal Matters

Q34: Do you handle matters regarding discovery in criminal cases?

A34: Yes, If so, please describe your practice? I handle my own discovery, usually on the papers.

General Trial Practice - Pretrial Matters

Q39: Do you require the filing of a trial brief?

A39: Yes, in both civil and criminal cases. I welcome but do not require them. Motions in limine are equally effective.

Q48: Do you typically hear and/or resolve Daubert motions at the final pretrial conference?

A48: Daubert motions ought be resolved before the close of discovery so a different expert may be substituted if necessary.

Q52: Do you require trial exhibits to be pre-marked? If so, please describe your practice?

A52: Yes, numbers when in evidence without regard to which party proffers them. Letters for identification A to Z then AA, AB, AC, ect. NOT AA, BB, CC.

Criminal - Scheduling Trials

Q53: Typically, when do you set a trial date in criminal cases?

A53: At the initial case management conference.

Q54: Typically, when do you set a trial date in civil cases?

A54: At the initial case management conference.

Q56: In civil cases, do you set time limits for counsel for opening statements, the presentation of evidence and/or closing arguments? If so, please describe your practice?

A56: Generally 15 minutes per side for opening statements, 30 minutes per side for closing arguments. The number of trial days is worked out by agreement at the final pre-trial conference. I keep time.

Criminal - Jury Selection

Q57: Please describe your jury selection process.

A57: I question the venire, handle excuses, seat the requisite number, ask each juror to say a few words about where they work and what they do, entertain preremptories (plaintiff or prosecution first then defense; no back strikes; on next round defense goes first and so on ). I pick the foreperson.

Q58: Under what circumstances, if any, have you or would you consider using a juror questionnaire?

A58: In cases with a great deal of publicity. In these cases the struck system is sometimes preferable.

Q59: If you would consider the use of a jury questionnaire, when and in what form should it be proposed?

A59: Questionnaires ought be short and address knowledge of case and potential bias, not an excursion into the potential jurors’ personal history.

General Trial Practice - Trial Practices

Q64: How many rounds of examination do you typically allow?

A64: No limits. The rules of evidence govern.

Q65: Under what, if any, circumstances, will you allow a rebuttal case?

A65: Under appropriate circumstances, but this ought happen rarely.

Q68: Do you provide a written copy of your jury charge to the jury?

A68: Yes, if the deliberations go into a second day.

Q71: If you have any particular practices as to bench trials, please describe them.

-A71: No reading of depositions. I’ll read them on my own.

Criminal - Sentencing/Revocation Hearings

Q72: Do you require a sentencing memorandum in every case?

A72: No, but I welcome them. I ought receive them in time to read and reflect on them.

Q73: If you do not require a sentencing memorandum in every case, when would it be helpful to you?

A73: No, but I welcome them. I ought to receive them in time to read and reflect on them.

Q74: Under what, if any, circumstances, would you consider an expedited sentencing?

A74: When the likely time of incarceration is less than the usual time to prepare.

Q75: Do you have any particular practices regarding the presentation of victim impact statements at sentencing?

A75: Such presentations ought come early in the hearing, before the guideline calculation and the arguments of counsel and allocution.

Q76: Under what, if any circumstances, would you consider the postponement of a sentencing hearing?

A76: When such postponement could favor the defendant and the government does not object.

Standing Orders & Miscellaneous Matters

Q79: Order #2

A79: Respondent skipped this question

Q80: Order #3

A80: Respondent skipped this question